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Snackshot of the Day: Devil's Food Cake Cockaigne

Snackshot of the Day: Devil's Food Cake Cockaigne

Photos of all things food and drink from The Daily Meal

Try not to eat the whole thing at once.

The Daily Meal's editors, contributors, and readers dig into some pretty great restaurants, festivals, and meals. There's not always enough time to give a full review of a restaurant or describe in depth why a place, its food, and the people who prepare it are noteworthy, so Snackshot of the Day does what photographs do best, rely on the image to do most of the talking.

Today's Snackshot is of the Devil's Food Cake Cockaigne from The Joy of Cooking. This cake is super-rich and decadent, and the raspberries on top are a perfect balance. It's made with a whipped ganache filling and a bittersweet glaze on top. Everyone needs a good chocolate cake in their repertoire, and this one seems like the perfect recipe. Got a friend with a birthday coming up? This will surely please them.

Read more about The Daily Meal's Snackshot feature. To submit a photo, email jbruce[at]thedailymeal.com, subject: "Snackshots." Follow The Daily Meal's photo editor Jane Bruce on Twitter.


Tag: devil’s food

Although this is not a cooking, or even a baking blog, I sometimes like to dream I'm a famous kitchen blogger.  I don't seem to have gotten the Julie/Julia gene though, so I content myself with knitting.  Nonetheless, I'm going to stray into kitchen territory with this post and show you all the cake I made for my second child's 19th birthday.  He wanted a cake that was both chocolate and white (but not marble) with vanilla frosting.

The secret to all good cakes, as I imparted to Ellie, who most decidely thought I had lost my mind, is using a recipe where you separate the eggs. 

Adding whipped egg whites at the end to a custardy batter mixture produces light moist cakes.  So I mixed up my white cake (actually a yellow cake recipe from The Joy of Cooking) and my chocolate cake (Devil's Food Cockaigne from the same book) and baked two white layers and a thick chocolate layer.  The chocolate custard that went into the batter was a crowd pleaser, with spoon tasting all around called for.

The cake layers turned out perfectly.

The only thing left was to put the layers together using Pastry Cream filling that I had made the night before and then to crumb coat the cake with this delicious Caramel Icing, which went underneath the Boiled White Frosting you can see in the picture above after Teddy blew out the candles.

A cake like this is a day-long labor of love, but oh so much fun to make!  I'm off to see if there is a slice left for a mid-afternoon snack.


/image bad sex joke

The Double Dome Institute of Advanced Thinking

@sammydog01 No one? Not even @bullrocky? Damn I’m old.

Well my boyfriend had my favorite dome until he drank on beer to many. Now he’s the ex-boyfriend hangin out in the Houston with new bracelets in the celldome.

I love this one too. Have never seen the building completely free of scaffolding.

@brhfl
Because Texans are all obsessed with size, the dome of the Texas State Capital Building is supposedly bigger than the one in Washington DC.

@f00l We love our scaffolding in DC…

Hmm, it is midnight on the right coast and still Friday night on the least coast, so I am pretty sure there is an obvious answer a lot of folks are thinking about but too polite to say.

After next Tuesday though, all bets are off .

@Ignorant Forget Arby’s, this is the real Meat Mountain.

Am I the only one who remembers the Kingdome?

@fastemily Attended a Seahawks/Redskins game there back in the early 1990s. It was a nice stadium.

In the running for ugliest:

ATT Stadium in Arlington, TX

@dijit27 it seems like it’s only a fraction of some of the others here.

@dijit27 This was my first thought, too! I think it counts.

@dijit27 My answer too. I spent the night on top 30 years ago. You can’t do that any more. Now my wife and I go to a vet conference in Yosemite and see it every year.

This was in 2009:

Reflected in Mirror Lake:

@SSteve
How tough a climb to the top (30 years ago)?

@f00l Getting to the top wasn’t awful. The worst part was that I had little hiking experience so I had really bad shoes and got some serious blisters. I even enjoyed going up the cables. A lot of the people in the party were a touch terrified at that part.

What did me in was coming back down. It turns out there’s something not right in my knees. When I walk downhill for an extended period of time it hurts a lot. As we got toward the end I couldn’t put any downhill weight at all on my right knee and my left knee was seriously painful. That slowed me down quite a bit. I could walk fine on level ground, though. I lived in a second-floor flat in San Francisco at the time. It was no fun walking down the two flights of stairs for a couple weeks.

@SSteve
Yeah I have the knee thing. One old, one w few ligaments are almost no cartilage. If I hiked anything but a fairly flat or even trail, I’d have to wear knee braces.

bet that climb was awesome. I went up a few mountains in Colorado or NM (not the big ones), and up Katahdin in Maine. The biggest prob was always my knees and leg muscles on the way down down.

Am fond of the (now) teeny tiny Astrodome

I think it’s the only dome to have its own Altman film.

Here is a clip of the finale of Brewster McCoud.
SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER

@f00l Technically Spaceship Earth is a full-on geodesic sphere.

Two men enter, one man leaves.

Was going to reference the TMNT villain base, but trying to check if it was one word or two, I was shocked to learn it is the Technodrome, with an R! I have been wrong for so long. I am so sorry, child Simon. Still the winner, though.

@simplersimon if you played turtles in time you would know better

@Pantheist I did play turtles in time. It was the first video game I ever beat! The shame is devouring me.

@simplersimon as it should be. I am proud of you for beating the game though, so it’s a wash.

/image chocolate souffle

Hollywood Cinerama Dome

Vermont’s capitol building has a lovely dome on it, with actual gold leaf. …but it’s FAKE! There’s no domed ceiling inside!

“Under The Dome” is such a bad, bad quality show. It’s just ridiculously bad. Bad writing, even worse acting. Absolutely terrible. We loved watching it through.

@serpent I thought it was pretty good until the last season…and maybe a little before the last.

@mehbee I thought it was bloody terrible since maybe 2-3 episodes in, but couldn’t stop watching - it’s like the current elections, a total trainwreck with no positive outcome possible, but so damn fascinating. Zero plot, zero acting, no likeable characters, absolute cringefest.

@serpent I couldn’t get through the first episode and my standards are incredibly low.

Climatron

Used to have a dome
/image metrodome

Now it’s a jawa sandcrawler
/image usbank stadium

@ButterQuark
Wonder who got an architectural award for that.

It’s not that it’s terrible, so much as that it’s a stupid variation on a theme for no reason except “well, nobody else already did this shape. Woohoo, we’re so innovative!”

Not exactly designed primarily to be a wonderful building to work and live in and around.

@LaVikinga
Oh, that’s a fav. Grandma’s house!

@PlacidPenguin, it’s your fault that I am now thinking about cake.

@PlacidPenguin
Around cake I turn into a four year old.

So different cake with tons of layers and fudge icing.

I don’t mean fudge flavored icing. I mean icing you makr from scratch with unsweetened Baker’s chocolate and cook to soft-boiled stagr and cool and then have to get onto the cake fast before it hardens too much.

Also black forest cake. Also ice cream cake.

Here a recipes similar to those my grandmother who didn’t insist on being “always-right” used.

I believe they can be found in Vintage copies of The Joy Of Cooking from the 1950s-1980’s. Perhaps they are still in the newest editions.

Devil’s Food Cake Cockaigne
with Chocolate Fudge Icing

This is a recipe out of The Joy of Cookingone-bit. I liked it because it took making a chocolate cake about as far as one could go in the direction of including chocolate. For suitable celebrations, a glass of champagne goes well with it. For less extreme occasions, a cup of coffee from freshly ground beans will suffice. It is a quality of cake suitable for feeding bite-by-bite to a close friend.
Devil’s Food Cake Cockaigne

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Prepare the following custard:

Cook and stir in a double boiler over — not in — boiling water:

Remove from the heat when thickened. Have other ingredients at about 70°F (21°C). Sift before measuring:

Beat until soft: ½ cup butter
Add and cream until light: 1 cup sifted sugar.
Beat in one at a time: 2 egg yolks

Add the flour to the butter mixture in 3 parts, alternating with the following mixture:

Stir the batter until smooth after each addition. Stir in the chocolate custard.

Whip until stiff, but not dry: 2 egg whites.

Fold them lightly into the cake batter. Bake in greased pan about 25 minutes. Spread when cool with Chocolate Fudge Icing.

This recipe is the icing for Devil’s Food Cake Cockaigne.

Prepare: Fudge Cockaigne. Use in all 1 cup milk. Beat until the icing is of the right consistency to be spread.
Fudge Cockaigne

Bring to a boil in a large heavy pan 1 cup minus 1 tablespoon milk.

Remove from the heat and stir in until dissolved:

Bring to a boil and cook covered 2 to 3 minutes until the steam washes down from the sides of the pan any crystals which may have formed. Uncover, reduce heat and cook without stirring to soft-ball stage 234°F (112°C). When nearing 234°F, there is a fine overall bubbling with, simultaneously, a coarser pattern, as though the fine bubbled areas were being pulled down for quilting into the coarser ones. Cool the candy to 110°F (43°C). You may hasten the process by placing the hot pan in a larger pan of cold water until the bottom of the pan has cooled.

Add: 2 to 4 tablespoons butter and beat fudge partially.

Add: 1 teaspoon vanilla Then beat until it begins to loose its sheen.

At this point the drip from the spoon, when you flip it over, holds its shape against the bottom of the spoon.

Quickly add ½ to 1 cup broken nutmeats. Pour the fudge into a buttered pan. Cut into squares before it hardens. To use fudge for centers, beat until thick, knead and shape.

Here is another icing recipe really similar to my grandmother’s

Family Recipe: Boiled Chocolate Icing
By Nealy Dozier

Boiled Chocolate Icing
Recipe adapted from Grandmother Mimmy and Joy of Cooking

Yields enough icing for one 2-layer cake

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
3 cups granulated sugar
1 1/2 cups whole or 2% milk
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3 squares unsweetened baking chocolate
1/4 cup heavy cream (optional)

In a large heavy saucepan, melt the butter, sugar, milk, and vanilla over low heat until the sugar is dissolved, about 5 minutes. Bring to a boil and cook, without stirring, for 1 minute. Brush down the sides of the pan with a pastry brush dipped in warm water to remove sugar crystals, then turn off heat. Stir in the chocolate until melted and smooth.

Return heat to medium. Brush down the sides of the pan again one more time with water. Cook the chocolate mixture, WITHOUT STIRRING, until it reaches 238°F, the soft-ball stage, approximately 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare an ice water bath in a large bowl. When icing reaches soft-ball temperature, place saucepan in water to stop the cooking. DO NOT STIR. Let the frosting cool to 120°F, approximately 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the water. Using an electric mixer, beat the icing on high speed for about 3-5 minutes. It should reach a pourable consistency. If it is too thick to pour, beat in heavy cream one tablespoon at a time until it is the right consistency.

Working quickly, frost the cake. Pour 1/3 of icing over the center of first layer and push out with a spatula. Add second cake layer and pour remaining icing over the top. Push out frosting so it runs over the sides of the cake. Smooth as much as possible. Let cake stand until icing sets and loses its sheen. Good luck!
Notes:

• To Make a 3-Layer Cake: Prepare an extra-large batch of the recipe, increasing all the ingredients by half (to make 1 1/2 batches). To frost the cake, pour 1/4 of the icing over the first layer, 1/4 of the icing over the second layer, and the remaining icing over top.

If you follow the link at the start of this recipe, there is much more info on that page.

Kinda confused as to why don’t you like cake.

@PlacidPenguin
I try not to like too much things I am somewhat addicted to.

/image fudge cake

I like this shape because, simply put, it looks cool. Vacation bag, hanging off a shoulder, wearing a white shirt - yeah, it’s a good look…

Under the dome was a Steven King book? Good, now I can read it, because the show just wandered around.

@smilingjack It’s not one of his better ones. Not horrible but…well, you know how it goes with King.

@smilingjack It was like a lot of his books- good start, OK middle and WTF ending. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t have an ending in mind when he sits down at his computer.

@sammydog01 this ending and Dreamcatcher were Wtf for me. I actually liked the Dreamcatcher movie ending much better… But I saw it before I read the book.

This one is super useful…

The 3 Domes in Milwaukee are the BEST domes!

Her’s an insane oceanic acquarium dome in Singapore - with water tunnels.

The Bodleian Library
Oxford UK

Anything in the Dome Mile. Including the Biosphere.

The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome. I really miss the old marshmallow on the skyline of downtown Minneapolis. So many great memories of watching the Twins in there, and the one Vikings game I went to (Brett Favre’s first home game as a Viking).

The hemispherical combustion chambers in a Mopar Hemi engine.

Enchanted rock - a granite dome west of Austin. It can be climbed in about an hour or a bit more. Take water, wear a hat a dark glasses, the granite reflects a lot of light and heat.

Enchanted Rock (16710 Ranch Rd 965, Fredericksburg TX) is an enormous pink granite pluton batholith located in the Llano Uplift approximately 17 miles (27 km) north of Fredericksburg, Texas and 24 miles (39 km) south of Llano, Texas, United States.

The state capital building in Atlanta.

You forgot this great dome

Also the Radyeland state house dome.

1:


Stand Facing the Stove: The Story of the Women Who Gave America The Joy of Cooking

This week I made Devil&aposs Food Cake Cockaigne, a lush chocolate cake that I hadn&apost thought about for several years. The occasion was my daughter Elin&aposs birthday, and while we&aposll be celebrating with joint party in a few weeks time, it seemed that Friday was a good night for a mini-fête. Four year old Jeanne particularly liked sprinkling little candy stars on top after the cake was iced, but apart from that I was a little disappointed.

Not sure if that is due to changing ability to taste things or t This week I made Devil's Food Cake Cockaigne, a lush chocolate cake that I hadn't thought about for several years. The occasion was my daughter Elin's birthday, and while we'll be celebrating with joint party in a few weeks time, it seemed that Friday was a good night for a mini-fête. Four year old Jeanne particularly liked sprinkling little candy stars on top after the cake was iced, but apart from that I was a little disappointed.

Not sure if that is due to changing ability to taste things or to a more developed appetite for exotic food. Whatever the cause, it made me start thinking of The Joy of Cooking, the first good cook book I ever got, and the delightful biography of the book's authors, Stand Facing the Stove: The Story of the Women Who Gave America the Joy of Cooking by Anne Mendelson.

Left a widow with a small legacy, Irma Rombauer decided to collect recipes and publish a cook book for women like herself who found themselves at the beginning of the Great Depression with the necessity to cook for their families for the first time in their lives. Some of them literally did not know how to boil water, hence the step by step directions which included "stand facing the stove." Aided by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, Mrs. Rombauer created a cook book that became one of the most successful ever. It did not bring her the fortune that it should have, though, which is one of the most fascinating portions of this biography.

Stand Facing the Stove appeared shortly before the book was completely revised by Mrs. Rombauer's grandson with the aid of a host of professional cooks. It removed much of the lively commentary that made earlier editions such fun to read. I remember thinking bah humbug when I saw it, and when I went looking for cook books for my kids when they started out on their own, I sought out earlier versions. The 1964 version, which is the one I have, gave me many evenings of entertaining reading when I was putting a lot of energy into learning how to cook well because I had discovered that eating well is, next to love, the greatest pleasure in life.

But I guess my taste for chocolate just isn't what it was. For the next birthday, I'll seek out some other dessert, I think.

If you think that writing and publishing this cookbook was a "piece of cake," you may find this book a shocking insight as I did. If you use "Joy of Cooking," the long and tortured history of its various editions finally going to press in will leave you amazed that it was ever published at all. And if you think of the Midwest mother and daughter who wrote it as compatible and mild-mannered, you are in for some big surprises.

Mendelson researched this book for over 10 years, which makes it dense If you think that writing and publishing this cookbook was a "piece of cake," you may find this book a shocking insight as I did. If you use "Joy of Cooking," the long and tortured history of its various editions finally going to press in will leave you amazed that it was ever published at all. And if you think of the Midwest mother and daughter who wrote it as compatible and mild-mannered, you are in for some big surprises.

Mendelson researched this book for over 10 years, which makes it dense with facts. Some sections seem non-chronological, in that first she tells the story from one perspective, then backtracks and tells it from another. Though sometimes she gives us too much information, the research is monumental. And who would imagine the story of a cookbook would be so complex and dramatic?

The story begins with Rombauer family history within the German community of Cincinnati in the Victorian era. Numerous themes are explored: ethnic community pride and its annihilation during WWI America, changing economics eliminating hired kitchen help in most households, suicide as an economic motivator, and parental dissatisfaction with grown children.

After self-publication of the first edition of "Joy," themes revolve around popular types of home-cooked foods and how they changed throughout time, and resultant writing of new editions with a diverse and sometimes petty and loathsome array of publishers, editors, family members, lawyers and friends drawn into the project (or refusing to be drawn in).

The first edition of "Joy" was published in 1931, and consisted of recipes collected by Irma Rombauer, a non-cook. The book is expanded and several other editions published by Bobs-Merrill, who engaged in copyright abuse and intimidation tactics. Many are the conflicts--between Irma and daughter/collaborator/co-author Marion, between publisher, illustrators, and authors, between Irma and family members. Both Irma and Marion develop health issues that make them fight for their lives, and in Marion's case also for the last and best edition.

This book is a great read, even though a few chapters in the middle seemed to backtrack--I would have liked more integration or fewer facts at that point. Still, it is utterly amazing the detail included--the Preface states the enormous and contradictory records that Mendelson fine-tooth-combed in which to write this fact-dense volume.

By all means read it if you use "Joy of Cooking," you will gain a new perspective on the sectional organization, the descriptions and the unique style in which the recipes are written (bold blocks of ingredients separated by plain text instructions on what to do with each block). And if you've ever wondered what "Cockiagne" means in your "Joy" recipes, the answer is most delightfully revealed here. (HINT: the book also tells about how cooks never read cookbook Forewords!)
. more

I thought I had read all of the worst written books of all time, but I was wrong. Now, I think I have. This one is now right up there, with other worst reads. &aposPedantic&apos is the first word that comes to mind, when speaking of Mendelson, or this book.

The first clue arrives early on, when Mendelson comments upon &aposthe generation&apos the Joy of Cooking was written for--its audience: " . more occupied with high-flown talk of cooking as an &aposart&apos, one of the signal delusions of our time." Credited as a I thought I had read all of the worst written books of all time, but I was wrong. Now, I think I have. This one is now right up there, with other worst reads. 'Pedantic' is the first word that comes to mind, when speaking of Mendelson, or this book.

The first clue arrives early on, when Mendelson comments upon 'the generation' the Joy of Cooking was written for--its audience: " . more occupied with high-flown talk of cooking as an 'art', one of the signal delusions of our time." Credited as a food historian, she finds cooking tiresome, time-wasting, and lacking in creativity, and references to cooking as art to be delusional. Why is she doing this for a living.

It is clear early that she holds herself, as an author, a true artiste, writing ABOUT cooking, far above the merely stumbling, lucky, Rombauer women, who cooked, for better or for worse, at times. It is then quite clear that she views cooking as an inferior, highly overrated field. Her rambling about most people having chefs, or "domestics" to cook for them was bizarre, at best. One has to wonder why she wrote this book, other than to capitalize upon the cookbook's amazing popularity and longevity.

"Food Historian" seems a grandiose term for this author, who deeply, truly needs a serious editor--an English teacher editor, preferably. Taking a grammar class might improve her writing. The sentence structure is deeply convoluted, as the author presumably tries to impress with her authority, skills, and great intelligence. I had to read one sentence three times, and then once aloud to several people, only to realize why the sentence made absolutely no sense--it had no subject, just unrelated clauses, and a verb.

I could find no record of Mendelson's educational background, only a brief, overly laudatory, Wikipedia listing of awards she has won, and books she has written. I had no interest in looking beyond that simple bio, as having read this book, I am pretty much 'done' with this author. If you are interested in reading about her topic, the Rombauers, as I was? Read ' Joy of Cooking' itself. Skip this book. It is NO joy. . more

Many readers would give this two-stars. It is dense with enmity between two authors and their publisher. And, really, who loves reading about contracts and dastardly deeds?

For me, it was a nostalgic retrospective of my own joy of cooking. When I married in 1978 I was given four cook books, the sum of my culinary resources: The Joy of Cooking, The Betty Crocker Cook Book, Better Homes & Gardens Cook Book, and Adele Davis&aposs Let&aposs Cook It Right, all mentioned in this book. The only cook book from t Many readers would give this two-stars. It is dense with enmity between two authors and their publisher. And, really, who loves reading about contracts and dastardly deeds?

For me, it was a nostalgic retrospective of my own joy of cooking. When I married in 1978 I was given four cook books, the sum of my culinary resources: The Joy of Cooking, The Betty Crocker Cook Book, Better Homes & Gardens Cook Book, and Adele Davis's Let's Cook It Right, all mentioned in this book. The only cook book from that era on my shelf is The Joy of Cooking. The decision to use line drawings in Joy instead of photographs — which date a book so decidedly — was brilliant.

Mendelson delves into the history of American cooking. Decades ago I typed all of my husband's (German) Granny Jo's heirloom recipes into a cookbook. There be oleo, condensed milk, canned fruit cocktail and cream of something soup. With that background, I happily tracked with the Chronicles of Cookery chapters.

I enjoyed getting to know St. Louis and the German-American culture better. The connections were entertaining. Irma von Starkloff (our Irma, of course) had a brief tumultuous romance with Booth Tarkington! When the family visited Germany they met Mark Twain. When in Paris, Irma hadlunch with Louisette Bertholle and Julia Child!

There were little inlets of recognition. Does my herb garden have its roots in Joy? I recalled repeatedly looking up the meaning of Cockaigne, a designated word that indicated a Rombauer/Becker favorite. And a chuckle remembering when 'foreign' cooking meant borsch, chop suey, minestrone, Italian meatballs, and goulash (all of which I've made back in the day).

On a wistful note, I had associated the Rombauer/Becker combination with the traditional church potluck milieu I was raised in. To read that Marion was a stated atheist was a dampening splash of water, reminiscent of reading that Julia Child was an ardent abortion supporter.

In those personal reading intersections that never fail to delight me, I chortled that I was reading Stand Facing the Stove, Range (a book about being a generalist) and The Last Battle concurrently. (Chapter 11 in SFtS is "The Last Battle.")


Vintage Cakes Cookbook – History Lesson

This giveaway entry period is now closed, but feel free to comment anyway! Also, make sure you enter the other open giveaways!

Continuing with the theme of “Back to School” for our cookbook giveaway, today we’re giving away a sweet little History lesson with Vintage Cakes, a cookbook of recipes for cakes from recent and sometimes distant past…

How to Enter this Cookbook Giveaway

  1. Leave a comment with your favorite kind of cake! Basic Chocolate Birthday Cake? Airy Angel Food Cake? Pineapple Upside Down Cake. Don’t worry if you don’t eat cake (like me), just make something up. It doesn’t matter what you say, as this is a random drawing, but it does matter that you do comment with something.
  2. Make sure to enter your email address in the box provided so we can contact you
  3. Share this giveaway post with your friends on facebook and twitter! (not required, but we’d love the help!)

You have until Thursday September13, 2012 at 5 PM PST to comment. Everyone is welcome to comment to enter, but we can only ship this stuff in the U.S. (So if you’re outside the US and win, you just need to provide us with a US mailing address to send!)

(And by the way, in case anyone is wondering, even though “I don’t always eat cake,” when I do, it’s always rich chocolate layer cake with chocolate ganache filling and super thick chocolate frosting!)

More Photos of Vintage Cakes:

Lovelight Chocolate Chiffon Cake with Chocolate Whipped Cream

Lemon Queen Cupcakes

Kentucky Bourbon Bundt Cake (. )

Info About the Author (from the publisher):

“Each recipe in Vintage Cakes is a confectionary stroll down memory lane. After sifting through her treasure trove of cookbooks and recipe cards, master baker and author Julie Richardson selected the most inventive, surprising, and just plain delicious cakes she could find. The result is a delightful and delectable time capsule of American baking, with recipes spanning a century.

Each cake has been expertly tested and retooled using the best ingredients and most up-to-date techniques. With precise and careful guidance, Richardson guides home bakers—whether total beginners or seasoned cooks—toward picture-perfect meringues, extra-creamy frostings, and lighter-than-air chiffons.

A few of the dreamy cakes that await: a chocolatey Texas Sheet Cake as large and abundant as its namesake state, the boozy Not for Children Gingerbread Bundt cake, and the sublime Lovelight Chocolate Chiffon Cake with Chocolate Whipped Cream. With recipes to make Betty Crocker proud, these nostalgic and foolproof sweets rekindle our love affair with cakes.”

I love a good, old fashioned white birthday cake — with an ultra-fluffy buttercream. I want to go and make that right now. While donning a frilly apron.

When I was a kid, I used to love those vanilla ice cream cakes with strawberry filling and vanilla frosting. They’d have to be refrigerated so when we ate them, they’d be so cold that you can barely tell which part is cake and which is frosting. Thinking of it still brings back memories of childhood. Yum!

as a southern girl,i love a made from scratch HummingBird Cake….its not very figure friendly but its amazingly good and sweet and its the best thing when youre with family

I love German chocolate cake!

Moi? I’m huge on strawberry chiffon cake, filled with fresh strawberries and iced simply in whipped cream. Heavenly.

just plain yellow or vanilla cake with a classic chocolate frosting will do..

My favorite vintage cake is Butternut Pound Cake. It’s hard to get the vanilla butternut flavoring but it’s so worth it!

My favor cake is the German Chocolate Cake. The first time I ever have a slice of this wonderful cake, I was about 8 years old. I still remember the day. I am now *

?^&*# and have three grand children. All three of them love German Chocolate cake. Now I have a reason to make it more often.

chocolate cake with ganache icing.

I’m a sucker for a good carrot cake. I don’t know if it’s the cream cheese frosting or the spicy sweetness of the cake, I just know that I love that combination.

This is a toss up for me between carrot cake and boozy bundt cakes – rum, whiskey, amaretto, whatever works!

Chocolate cake with white buttercream!

Any kind of lemon layer cake!

My favorite cake for my birthday has always been chocolate cake with chocolate frosting! Yummy!

Fluffy yellow cake with chocolate frosting and LOTS of pink frosting flowers!

I can’t get enough angel food cake with strawberries and whipped cream…

Coconut Cream Pie Cake. <33

Milkyway cake. As soon as I found out those existed, I made one and ate it.


Snackshot of the Day: Devil's Food Cake Cockaigne - Recipes

Tonight we celebrate Anne’s birthday with a cake.


Strawberries Chocolate Raspberries

Rather than spelling out the details of a two day baking process – I’ll give you the essentials and trust that you will be able to sort out the more mundane elements.

This cake had seven layers, (eight if you count the plate).
Whipped Cream
Berry MousseCake
Berry Mousse
Meringue
Whipped Cream
Cake
Plate

To make two layers of the richest, most dense chocolate cake flavored with expresso, rum, and Callebaut chocolate, I adapted Susan G. Purdy’s recipe for Marvelous Mud Cake from my chocolate spotted edition of her book, A Piece of Cake.

The meringue was made with four egg whites, a quarter of a cup of sugar, a pinch of salt, half a teaspoon of lemon juice, a teaspoon of vanilla and cup of sugar mixed with two tablespoons of cornstarch.

It’s a simple process, the egg whites are beaten with the salt and lemon juice until foamy, the quarter of a cup of sugar is beaten in gradually until the egg whites have formed stiff shiny peaks, then the vanilla and sugar/cornstarch is folded in. Using a cake pan I drew a circle on a piece of parchment paper, spread the meringue onto the paper and piped small meringue kisses with the rest.

The meringues baked for two hours at two hundred degrees, and spent the night in the turned off the oven, protected from humid air and any mice passing through the kitchen.

The berry mousse I made was a mixture of raspberries, strawberries, cassis, gelatin and whipped cream. Your favorite recipe will work – it can be as simple as sweetened fruit folded into whipped cream or complicated enough to make Julia Child proud.

In Vermont whipped cream begins with cold, heavy cream, in a glass bottle from a local dairy and is not ultra-pasteurized. The cream is beaten until stiff and that’s it. No sugar, no vanilla, no additions necessary. I used three cups of cream.

The party was a delicious event, the cake remained intact for the drive up the beautiful but rutted dirt road and after an amazing dinner, we tried to dance off calories with songs like Rock Around the Clock.

Happy Birthday Anne!
notes – The cake I made took a lot of time, but there are a number of options that will shorten the time considerably. Make a simple chocolate cake, substitute room temperature coffee or espresso for some or all of the liquid in the recipe, use rum or bourbon to replace a quarter of the liquid required, ask a baker if you can buy a cake without frosting, use softened ice cream flavored with berries or strawberry ice cream instead of mousse and you will have an ice cream cake, no one will know if you decide to leave out the meringue layer. You can use real cream in an aerosol can BUT—-if you use whipped topping the cows, the farmers and I will be very disappointed.

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• 5 Responses to “Anne’s Birthday Cake”

Most dense chocolate cake flavored with expresso, rum, and Callebaut chocolate. But there are a number of options that will shorten the time considerably. Make a simple chocolate cake, substitute room temperature coffee or espresso for some or all of the liquid in the recipe.

This is so my kind of sinful, rich dessert. most dense chocolate cake flavored with expresso, rum, and Callebaut chocolate. Thank you for the tips that you share on us.

I made the Marvelous Mud Cake from the cookbook A Piece of Cake but I also like the Devil's Food Cake Cockaigne cake in the Joy of Cooking.

A bit of rum sprinkled on the cake during assembly adds to the richness.

I am amazed! This is so my kind of sinful, rich dessert. Lucky Anne! I can't wait for the recipe for the cake! Love your blog, too.

ANd I received my watercolor painting of yours- I love it! Beautiful work.


Chocolate Butter Cake Recipe & Video

This Chocolate Butter Cake is moist and tender and the two layers are sandwiched together and frosted with a satiny smooth chocolate frosting. This is the cake I make for birthdays, anniversaries and other festive occasions. It doesn't really need any garnish, but you could decorate with some colorful sprinkles, or it looks great with a medley of fresh berries piled in the center.

Once the cake layers have been baked and completely cooled, the layers are sandwiched together and frosted with a delicious chocolate butter frosting. You can use either a semi sweet or a bittersweet chocolate in this frosting. Just be sure to use a good quality chocolate that you enjoy eating out of hand.

Chocolate Cake: Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C) and place the oven rack in the center of the oven. Butter, or spray with a nonstick vegetable spray, two - 9 x 2 inch deep (23 x 5 cm) round baking pans. Then line the bottoms of the pans with parchment paper.

First, in a heatproof bowl, place the finely chopped unsweetened chocolate and cocoa powder. Add the hot coffee (or boiling water) and stir until the mixture is melted and smooth. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

Meanwhile, in a separate bowl, whisk to combine (or sift), the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

In the bowl of your electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, beat the butter until smooth. Add the sugars and beat, on medium high speed, until the mixture is soft and fluffy (this will take about 3-4 minutes). Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Add the vanilla extract and melted chocolate mixture and beat to combine.

Add the flour mixture (in three additions) alternately with the milk (in two additions), beginning and ending with the flour mixture. Beat only until the ingredients are incorporated.

Divide the batter evenly between the two prepared pans and smooth the tops with an offset spatula or the back of a spoon. Bake for about 30 - 35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean and the tops spring back when lightly pressed. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool for about 10 minutes. Then, one cake at a time, place a wire rack on top of the cake pan and invert, lifting off the pan. Remove the parchment paper and then, to prevent cracks, reinvert the cake onto a greased wire rack so that tops are right side up. Cool completely before frosting.

Frosting: Melt the chocolate in a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.

In the bowl of your electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, beat the butter until smooth. Add the sugar and vanilla extract and beat until it is light and fluffy (about 2-3 minutes). Add the melted chocolate and beat on low speed until incorporated. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat until frosting is smooth and glossy (about 2-3 minutes).

To Assemble: Place one layer of cake on your serving plate and cover with a layer of frosting. Then place the second layer of cake onto the first cake layer and then frost the top and sides of the cake with the remaining frosting. Can garnish with sprinkles, fresh fruit or shaved chocolate.This cake is at its best the day it's made. But it can be covered and stored at room temperature (or in the refrigerator) for about three days.

4 ounces (120 grams) unsweetened chocolate , finely chopped

3 tablespoons (25 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder (regular unsweetened or Dutch processed)


Best Cookbooks 2012

Here are my absolute favorite cookbooks of 2012…

1. Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, Deb Perlman
Everything…just everything in this cookbook from blogger Deb Perlman screams “Cook Me!” The combination of creative recipes, lush photography and chatty “you can do this” writing make it a must-have for the holidays.

2. Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi
As much a social commentary on life in this melting pot of a metropolis as cookbook, Jerusalem dives into the homey, rich heritage of Jewish and Palestinian cooking. Even if you didn’t think you like Middle Eastern food, you’re likely to change your mind perusing the pictures and reading the stories of this insightful cookbook.

3. Canal House Cooks Everyday by Christopher Hirsheimer and Melissa Hamilton
Seasonal cooking is great, but Canal House cookbooks take it to an extreme — creating recipes for each day of the year. Beautifully illustrated with photos from the pair’s New Jersey kitchen and workshop.

4. Pioneer Woman Cooks, Ree Drummond
Every food writer has a food blogger they love to hate. Ree is mine. Mostly because I’m so jealous. She’s a great mom, has her own show, makes delicious food and creates recipes that just work out perfectly. I frequently consult her website for weeknight meal ideas, and I haven’t been let down yet.

5. Art of Fermentation, Sandor Katz
Fermenting is brilliant. Especially for your gut. Learn how to get fizzy, bubbly and fermented with the king of fermentation.

A few others I loved earlier in the year…

Japanese Farm Food, Nancy Singleton Hachisu, Andrews McMeel Publishing, $35
The most beautiful book released this fall is this love letter to the simple, pure foods of the Japanese countryside. American-born, Nancy is married to a Japanese egg farmer, over the years adopting the community, culture and cuisine of an ancient, rural Japan as her own. Written as both memoir and cookbook, Hachisu describes the book as, “…just our Hachisu family food. It is a compilation of traditional dishes that my husband grew up with and new ones that he or I created. I had never seen a cookbook that approached Japanese food in the way my husband did–main ingredient and field or fish market driven so I never felt compelled to cook the recipes I saw in other books.” And while many of the pickled, preserved flavors and ingredients may seem foreign to American palates, but Hachisu bridges the gap with simple, homey preparations.

Bouchon Bakery, Thomas Keller, Artisan, $50
It’s so cute that any of us think we could actually make croissants like the famed Yountville bakery run by culinary rockstar Thomas Keller. Oh, we can certainly try, and this new book written in a breezy, sweet style does actually lull you into thinking this recipe blueberry muffins with almond streusel might turn you into a morning hero. But it takes years to become as deft with butter and flour as Keller and co-author/executive pastry chef Sebastein Rouxel . So buy the book, set it in your kitchen and dunk your Oreos in milk while dreaming of buttercream and the perfect French macaron.

101 Classic Cookbooks: 501 Classic Recipes, edited by Fales Library, Rizzoli, $50
Like a mix-tape of just the good songs, this cookbook assembles the best of the best recipes as chosen by the likes of Jonathan Gold, Michael Pollan and Ruth Reichl from the 55,000 cookbooks of the Fales Library at New York University. That means tried-and-true classics such as Julia Child’s Boeuf Bourguignon, Elizabeth David’s Bouillabaisse, Marcella Hazan’s Bolognese Ragu, Jacques Pepin’s Brioche, James Beard’s Pig Hamburgers, and Irma Rombauer’s Devil’s Food Cake Cockaigne. As if that wasn’t enough star power, Judith Jones, Florence Fabricant and Alice Waters are contributors and Marion Nestle has written the forward. Required reading.

“The Great Meat Cookbook”, Bruce Aidells, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $40
There aren’t many chefs who could get away with an entire chapter on veal. Even fewer who would devote nearly a hundred pages to lamb and goat. But Bruce Aidells is the undisputed heavy-weight champion of animal protein, and his new book is his ring. In exhaustive detail, he discusses everything from how to perfectly sear a cut of bison to the differences between grass-fed, grain-finished and organically-raised meats. A meaty-read for sure.

“Modernist Cuisine at Home”, by Nathan Myhrvold and Maxime Bilet, The Cooking Lab, $140
So you couldn’t justify the $625 for Modernist Cuisine, the five-volume Bible of modern cooking and drool-worthy photos. Using the same cross-sectioned photo techniques and detailed explanations, the home version does for pot roast what Modernist Cuisine did for restaurant menus.


Question Of The Day, Sunday, January 21, 2018

I'm not a cake person. Desserts really are not my thing but if I were to have dessert, it would be a chocolate mousse made with high quality imported dark chocolate. DD and I were talking about cake the other day and we agreed that we'd rather skip the cake altogether and just eat a bowl of cream cheese frosting with a spoon. I love cream cheese frosting.

Icing and frosting are not the same thing.

Frosting is usually used to coat the outside of cake. It has a buttercream-like texture and a more buttery taste. Icing is generally used to glaze pastries or cakes, and tastes more sugary than frosting. The Williams-Sonoma cookbook Cake states that “icing is generally thinner and glossier,” while its counterpart frosting is “a thick, fluffy mixture, used to coat the outside of a cake.”

Max's Human

Betsygee

Just what part of meow don't you understand.

Just the opposite here. Coconut is my second favorite, carrot is first. But of course, with the caveat of no raisins.

Bodester413

TCS Member

I think the universe is telling me I need to bake a cake. This morning a friend tortured me by emailing me a photo of an orange cherry thunder cake that he made. ( Half eaten in the picture) and now this is the question of the day. LOL

Chocolate cherry cake has always been one of my favorites. A slice of cake cut in half with a layer of vanilla ice cream in between. maybe topped with a bit of extra cherry pie filling. yummy!

Boris Diamond

Cat Valet

Raysmyheart

TCS Member

It's funny that I do LOVE chocolate cake with not-so-sweet frosting like you get in the store bakery, but I do not care for cake otherwise. That is kind of strange to me. I even can perplex myself.

@Winchester , I think Cook's Country is awesome!

Cassiopea

TCS Member

Does cheesecake count? as I am a cheesecake lover!


Otherwise, I also really like angel food cake, and fairly flexible in terms of butter cakes, like chocolate. I also like cake with cinnamon or coffee cake.

MoochNNoodles

TCS Member

Debbila

TCS Member

I'm not a cake person. Desserts really are not my thing but if I were to have dessert, it would be a chocolate mousse made with high quality imported dark chocolate. DD and I were talking about cake the other day and we agreed that we'd rather skip the cake altogether and just eat a bowl of cream cheese frosting with a spoon. I love cream cheese frosting.

Icing and frosting are not the same thing.

Frosting is usually used to coat the outside of cake. It has a buttercream-like texture and a more buttery taste. Icing is generally used to glaze pastries or cakes, and tastes more sugary than frosting. The Williams-Sonoma cookbook Cake states that “icing is generally thinner and glossier,” while its counterpart frosting is “a thick, fluffy mixture, used to coat the outside of a cake.”

Micknsnicks2mom

TCS Member
Thread starter

By now, you all know that my favorite cake is a two-layer white coconut cake with a seven-minute frosting and extra coconut in the filling between the layers. Yum! It's my Christmas dessert and (sometimes) at Easter, too.

The best homemade coconut cake, IMO, is from a recipe from Cook's Country. The cake is made with cream of coconut as is the frosting. When I make it, sometimes I toast some of the coconut, so there's a good mixture of toasted and white all over the cake. Other times, I won't toast it, so the cake is a white snowball of coconut. Either way, it's just delicious (if you like coconut, that is). This recipe also makes wonderful cupcakes.

The best bakery coconut cake is from a local restaurant. You can order the cake with a raspberry filling or a lemon curd filling if you don't want the frosting between the layers. We've done both of them and they're both really good, although the lemon is better. I always request extra coconut either way.

Rick's favorite cake is probably the Hershey's Perfectly Chocolate Chocolate cake with whipped peanut butter frosting. I think he could overdose on that cake.

I've made snickerdoodle cakes and they're excellent. I could probably go with half the frosting, too, but Rick's sweet tooth would not allow it.

your favorite is a two-layer white coconut cake with a seven-minute frosting and extra coconut in the filling between the layers. definitely a most delicious cake!!

and your Rick's favorite is the Hershey's Perfectly Chocolate Chocolate cake with whipped peanut butter frosting!! i love that cake, and the whipped peanut butter frosting.

honestly, i don't know why i prefer less frosting now i'm older. i used to be fine with a regular amount of frosting on cakes. and i do enjoy desserts, and always have something for dessert, every day. the nanaimo bars i have often are very, very sweet -- and i enjoy them.


Christina’s playful desserts, including the compost cookie, a chunky chocolate-chip cookie studded with crunchy salty pretzels and coffee grounds the crack pie, a sugary-buttery confection as craveable as the name implies the cereal milk ice cream, made from everyone’s favorite part of a nutritious breakfast—the milk at the bottom of a bowl of cereal and the easy layer cakes that forgo fancy frosting in favor of unfinished edges that hint at the yumminess inside helped the restaurants earn praise from the New York Times and the Michelin Guide and led to the opening of Milk Bar, which now draws fans from around the country and the world.

“Cooking shouldn’t just be about making a delicious dish—owning the process and enjoying the experience ought to be just as important as the meal itself. The new Joy of Cooking is a reminder that nothing can compare to gathering around the table for a home cooked meal with the people who matter most.” —Joanna Gaines, author of Magnolia Table

In the nearly ninety years since Irma S. Rombauer self-published the first three thousand copies of Joy of Cooking in 1931, it has become the kitchen bible, with more than 20 million copies in print. This new edition of Joy has been thoroughly revised and expanded by Irma’s great-grandson John Becker and his wife, Megan Scott.

John and Megan developed more than six hundred new recipes for this edition, tested and tweaked thousands of classic recipes, and updated every section of every chapter to reflect the latest ingredients and techniques available to today’s home cooks. Their strategy for revising this edition was the same one Irma and Marion employed: Vet, research, and improve Joy’s coverage of legacy recipes while introducing new dishes, modern cooking techniques, and comprehensive information on ingredients now available at farmers’ markets and grocery stores.

You will find tried-and-true favorites like Banana Bread Cockaigne, Chocolate Chip Cookies, and Southern Corn Bread—all retested and faithfully improved—as well as new favorites like Chana Masala, Beef Rendang, Megan’s Seeded Olive Oil Granola, and Smoked Pork Shoulder. In addition to a thoroughly modernized vegetable chapter, there are many more vegan and vegetarian recipes, including Caramelized Tamarind Tempeh, Crispy Pan-Fried Tofu, Spicy Chickpea Soup, and Roasted Mushroom Burgers. Joy’s baking chapters now include gram weights for accuracy, along with a refreshed lineup of baked goods like Cannelés de Bordeaux, Rustic No-Knead Sourdough, Ciabatta, Chocolate-Walnut Babka, and Chicago-Style Deep-Dish Pizza, as well as gluten-free recipes for pizza dough and yeast breads.

A new chapter on streamlined cooking explains how to economize time, money, and ingredients and avoid waste. You will learn how to use a diverse array of ingredients, from amaranth to za’atar. New techniques include low-temperature and sous vide cooking, fermentation, and cooking with both traditional and electric pressure cookers. Barbecuing, smoking, and other outdoor cooking methods are covered in even greater detail.


Watch the video: Devils Food Cake Bakealong. Cupcake Jemma Classic (December 2021).