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All-Purpose Vinaigrette

All-Purpose Vinaigrette

Not just for salads: Drizzle over roast potatoes, serve alongside rotisserie chicken, or spoon over a sandwich.

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk oil, vinegar, shallot, and thyme in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Do Ahead: Dressing can be made 4 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Recipe by Jenny Rosenstrach and Andy Ward,Reviews Section

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • Dash of salt
  • Dash of black pepper

Nutritional Information

  • Calories 52
  • Fat 5.4g
  • Satfat 0.8g
  • Monofat 3.9g
  • Polyfat 0.6g
  • Protein 0.0g
  • Carbohydrate 1g
  • Fiber 0.0g
  • Cholesterol 0.0mg
  • Iron 0.0mg
  • Sodium 78mg
  • Calcium 1mg
  • Sugars 0g

What kind of vinegar is best to use for cleaning?

White vinegar is considered to be the most acidic vinegar out there and the strongest option for making a household cleaner. So when it comes to picking out a vinegar for cleaning purposes, I recommend going with distilled white vinegar. There’s no need to go organic when it comes to purchasing a vinegar for cleaning, just go with the most economical option you can find. I prefer buying a large bulk bottle of vinegar as vinegar is the most-used cleaning ingredient in my home.


Why I Make My Grandmother's Homemade Salad Dressing Every Time I Host

This simple vinaigrette is the perfect all-purpose dressing.

There are plenty of secret languages in the South. Barbecue speak, Cajun vernacular, angry Southern Mama, high school football coach. But none transcends generations quite like that of the handwritten (or often word-of-mouth) recipe.

Whether stowed in a recipe tin, pasted in a book, or safely tucked away in a memory, family recipes are part of what makes cooking so special. Christmas hams, party cocktails, elegant layer cakes, and cookout classics fill the dictionaries of Southern family recipes, but one of my favorites is a simple vinaigrette from my grandmother.

This recipe is so simple, in fact, that I&aposve never bothered to make another salad dressing recipe at home. Its name? Well it doesn&apost really have one we&aposve always just called it "Grandmama Dressing." I don&apost know where it came from and whether she made it up herself or found it somewhere, but that doesn&apost really matter. Grandmama Dressing is a better name than "Easy Vinaigrette," or "Quick Salad Dressing," in my opinion.

A homemade salad dressing is one of those small details that dinner party guests always notice. No one would bat an eyelash if you served bottled dressing of course, but when they see you whip out the homemade stuff, they think, "Wow, that&aposs so thoughtful that she took the time to make it." Just like crafting personalized place cards or buying your friend&aposs current local beer pick, a homemade salad dressing makes a subtle but oddly meaningful difference. Plus, it&aposs a conversation starter. With Grandmama Dressing, I&aposm asked for the recipe every single time.

Grandmama&aposs Homemade Vinaigrette only takes four ingredients, which I always have in my pantry anyway. Oil (whatever you have on hand, I usually use canola or vegetable, since they&aposre milder than olive oil, but a little EVOO would work just fine), Tabasco (or your hot sauce of choice), red wine vinegar, and sugar. That&aposs it. And if I have those four ingredients in my pantry as a twenty-something amateur cook, I know everyone else probably will, too. Even with so few ingredients, this vinaigrette has big flavor payoff. A bit sweet from sugar, a bit acidic from vinegar, a bit spicy from hot sauce, and rounded out with neutral oil, this homemade vinaigrette recipe is the perfect all-purpose salad dressing. One of our favorite ways to serve it is over a mixed greens salad with strawberries, mandarin oranges, toasted almonds, and crumbled feta or goat cheese. I&aposve served it with pretty main-dish salads that include grilled chicken or steak and over an upgraded bag-o-salad from the grocery store (I did say I was an amateur, remember?). Regardless what&aposs in-season as far as salad toppings, this dressing is going to taste good with them.

The thing that makes this recipe even easier? The measurements. All you have to remember is ¼, ¼, two, two. One-fourth cup of oil, ¼ tsp hot sauce, 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar, 2 Tbsp sugar. It&aposs impossible to forget, and even people like me who have to calculate tips on an iPhone can double or triple it for a crowd. You can whisk the ingredients together in a bowl or shake them up in a Tupperware container. I&aposve even used a protein shake bottle to take it to potlucks, which is perfect for no-spill traveling, shaking, and serving.

Grandmama Dressing might not be fancy, but it&aposs irreplaceable in my recipe repertoire. Get the full recipe here.

Need a little salad inspiration to use with Grandmama&aposs Homemade Vinaigrette? Our Dixie Chicken Salad with Grapes, Honey, Almonds, and Broccoli is a delicious place to start.


Citrus Vinaigrette – The All-Purpose Dressing

I love citrus. And I love this salad citrus vinaigrette so much. The best part about this dressing is that you can store it for up to one week in your fridge and its ready to go whenever you need. The addition of xanthan gum in this vinaigrette recipe means you don’t have to worry about the dressing splitting either. It’s also incredibly easy to make – just add all the ingredients and blend.

This dressing adds a fresh lemon flavour and balance to anything it touches and is awesome when mixed into a grain salads, leafy green salads or drizzled over some steamed vegetables. It’s also vegan!

If you’ve never used xanthan gum before and are scared to use it, don’t be. I wrote a little bit about why you don’t have to worry about using xanthan gum here. You can still make this delicious vinaigrette without the xanthan gum but it will not be nearly as nice and definitely won’t stay emulsified.

Chefs and emulsifying stuff

Most chefs love emulsified ingredients because they almost always taste better. An emulsification is just the binding of two ingredients like oil and water which would not normally bind together. Mayonnaise and hollandaise are perfect examples of this. If you’ve ever tasted a split mayonnaise you will know that it tastes like oil and then vinegar, whereas an emulsified mayonnaise will taste balanced. A split mayonnaise will also look horrible too.

There are some exceptions like salsa verde and some fresh pestos that are really nice not emulsified. This is okay and often desired but generally with vinaigrette we always want the emulsified goodness.

What can you use this for?

Citrus vinaigrette is pretty neutral so you can use it for so many applications.


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Blissful All Purpose Vinaigrette

This is one of my favorite dressings/marinades/sauces/dips of all time (hence the “All Purpose” in the name). It is tangy, sweet, and rich but light in calories and easy to make! What a happy little dressing.

I use this as salad dressing, but it’s also perfect for tossing pasta salad, marinating portobellos and other veggies before grilling (woo-hoo grilled veggie season is almost here!), and for dressing steamed veggies and quinoa – our family’s go-to meal at least twice a week! We just steam up whatever we have in the fridge – carrots, celery, peppers, mushrooms, kale or chard, onions, broccoli etc., and make quinoa, brown rice, or couscous in the rice cooker. Then I make a yummy sauce to cover it (very often it is this one) and bada-bing, bada-boom, dinner is served!

All Purpose Vinaigrette ( The *’s indicate the slightly more time consuming but especially tasty options!)

1/2 C. Walnut oil or the oil from the sun dried tomato jar* (I use Mediterranean Organics sun dried tomatoes)

1 clove garlic, minced or ground into a paste with 2 pinches of salt*

3 tbsp apple cider vinegar or fresh squeezed lemon juice*

3 tbsp Balsamic or Sherry* vinegar

1 tbsp Bragg’s Liquid Aminos (Don’t have this in your pantry? Go out and get some! Bragg’s Aminos is a staple in my kitchen – it’s a low sodium and gluten-free alternative to soy sauce, and we use it instead of salt in many of our recipes.)

1/4 tsp both salt and pepper

Pour all ingredients in a large canning jar – secure lid and shake well before each use! (No canning jars? you can also whisk all ingredients in a bowl and pour into a dressing bottle or the likes.)


Kathy Nichols

I used to buy salad dressings, but I found that if we made our favorite vinaigrette in bulk that it kept well and could be used for many purposes. My husband and I make it a little differently. I mix extra virgin olive oil with an equal amount of balsamic vinegar and add a heaping serving-size spoonful of Dijon mustard. I often add one pressed garlic clove. I make approximately a cup at a time. Here is the official recipe. I personally prefer it with more vinegar, and I find that it is less likely to solidify in the refrigerator with more vinegar (which makes it easier to use – you don’t have to warm it up to mix it).

2 Tablespoons Balsamic vinegar
5 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey

In this recipe, the mustard is important it emulsifies the solution (meaning it keeps the oil and water mixed). The honey is optional, and we stopped using it when we cut back on our sugar consumption. I enjoy fresh herbs in my salads, but I add them directly to the salad rather than putting them in the dressing. That way the dressing keeps longer in the refrigerator.

There are lots of ways to use this vinaigrette! It is great for regular salads, as well as for salads made with cabbage, brown rice, beans, pasta or even potatoes. I like to chop up left-overs from dinner and make them into a salad with a little of this dressing. The dressing is a good marinade for barbeque meats, and for roasted or barbequed vegetables. You can always add more ingredients if you wish. I often add some sort of heat as a meat marinade (Thai chili sauce, cayenne, Tabasco – something hot). And I often add a little curry to vegetables.

A big advantage of making your own dressing, besides that it is SO good, is that you are making it with a healthy oil and no additives. All oils, including olive oil, is about 100 calories per tablespoon. The way I make this dressing (1/2 oil and ½ vinegar – see the notes preceding the recipe), lowers the calories to 50 per tablespoon. Be reasonable in the quantities you use, because the calories can add up. But at least the olive oil is a mono-unsaturated fat with some health benefits of its own.

There are lots of great vinaigrette recipes. You can use other vinegars and other oils – walnut oil is an especially good alternative. So you may enjoy experimenting. I offer this one as a very easy approach to get you started. Enjoy!


GF Blog

This is one of my favorite dressings/marinades/sauces/dips of all time (hence the &ldquoAll Purpose&rdquo in the name). It is tangy, sweet, and rich but light in calories and easy to make! What a happy little dressing.

I use this as salad dressing, but it&rsquos also perfect for tossing pasta salad, marinating portobellos and other veggies before grilling (woo-hoo grilled veggie season is almost here!), and for dressing steamed veggies and quinoa &ndash our family&rsquos go-to meal at least twice a week! We just steam up whatever we have in the fridge &ndash carrots, celery, peppers, mushrooms, kale or chard, onions, broccoli etc., and make quinoa, brown rice, or couscous in the rice cooker. Then I make a yummy sauce to cover it (very often it is this one) and bada-bing, bada-boom, dinner is served!

  • 1/2 C. Walnut oil or the oil from the sun dried tomato jar* (I use Mediterranean Organics sun dried tomatoes)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or ground into a paste with
    2 pinches of salt*
  • 1 tbsp Dijon Mustard
  • 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar or fresh squeezed lemon juice*
  • 3 tbsp Balsamic or Sherry* vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Bragg&rsquos Liquid Aminos (Don&rsquot have this in your pantry? Go out and get some! Bragg&rsquos Aminos is a staple in my kitchen &ndash it&rsquos a low sodium and gluten-free alternative to soy sauce, and we use it instead of salt in many of our recipes.)
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup 1 tbsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1/4 tsp both salt and pepper

Pour all ingredients in a large canning jar &ndash secure lid and shake well before each use! (No canning jars? you can also whisk all ingredients in a bowl and pour into a dressing bottle or the likes).